Loading Events
Less than 30 minutes

Brought to you by

U.S. Senate Historical Office

Cost

Free

Add to my List

In 1878 Senator Aaron Sargent became the first member of Congress to formally propose a constitutional amendment specifically to extend voting rights to women. The Senate never voted on Sargent’s proposal, but the idea and the suffragists who supported it persisted. Senators—some of them working closely with activists—continued to debate women’s political rights over the next four decades as suffrage lobbyists ramped up pressure on members of Congress. After several failed attempts, the Senate finally approved a constitutional amendment for woman suffrage on June 4, 1919. Ratified in 1920, the Nineteenth Amendment to the Constitution includes only 39 words, two sentences that represent the work of generations of activists and a dedicated group of congressional reformers.

Share On

Dive Deeper

Reconstruction and Its Impact on Human Rights

Reconstruction and Its Impact on Human Rights

By State Historical Museum of Iowa

  • Anytime/On Your Own
Podcast: Gay Life in 1950s Cherry Grove, New York

Podcast: Gay Life in 1950s Cherry Grove, New York

By New-York Historical Society

  • Anytime/On Your Own
War Remains, A Virtual Reality Experience

War Remains, A Virtual Reality Experience

By National WWI Museum and Memorial

Party with Us in San Diego

Party with Us in San Diego

By Museum of Us

  • Live in Real Time

06/22/2024

Track Legislation on Congress.gov

Track Legislation on Congress.gov

By Library of Congress

  • Anytime/On Your Own
Who’s Fourth of July? African Americans and the Fourth of July

Who’s Fourth of July? African Americans and the Fourth of July

By Omohundro Institute / Ben Franklin’s World: A Podcast About Early American History

  • Anytime/On Your Own